Wendy E. Goodwin, MD

When it comes to qualifications to opine on the long-term functional prognosis of a person under 21 who has suffered personal injury, Dr. Goodwin has a scope and depth of experience that is difficult to match.

Why Dr. Wendy Goodwin?

All too often, the fate of a lawsuit becomes a "battle of the experts." Defense to plaintiff ratios are scrutinized, resumes are critiqued, experts are cross-examined tirelessly and credibility is put on the line. Stakes are high for both parties and the attorneys representing them. All of this causes a sense of pressure with which not many physicians are comfortable. The last thing that either side needs is to lose credibility with a physician who is going to tell an attorney what he thinks the attorney wants to hear or answers questions beyond the scope of their expertise.

Dr. Goodwin's highest priority is integrity. She is well versed in diplomatic but direct communication of her opinions, having practiced for years in a large pediatric hospital in a niche specialty of medicine, often in the middle of the conflicting expectations of other medical teams and patients' families. This included daily communication with multiple medical teams and family members, who were not always on the same page regarding discharge plans, transfer to rehabilitation facilities, long-term prognosis and end-of-life care issues. She was often requested by the ICU and Trauma Teams to help lead case conferences for prognosis discussions and end-of-life issues on comatose children who had suffered devastating brain injuries. Though her opinions were not always what others wanted to hear at that time, they were always delivered with unwavering compassion and a dedication to integrity. Her philosophy was that families always deserve the complete truth, delivered from one parent to another, and whatever decisions the family made subsequently would be the right ones.

When it comes to qualifications to opine on the long-term functional prognosis of a person under 21 who has suffered personal injury, Dr. Goodwin has a scope and depth of experience that is difficult to match. She attended a four-year residency at Baylor Medical Center in Dallas, where she trained in its large freestanding rehabilitation hospital with entire floors dedicated to spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury. During residency, she served for three years as team physician for a local high school football team.

After residency, she worked in private practice specializing in occupational medicine / worker's compensation cases and gained much experience in handling neck pain, back pain, other musculoskeletal problems and performing electrodiagnostic testing.

She then pursued two more years of training in a Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine fellowship, where she worked for many months in the largest freestanding pediatric rehabilitation hospital in Texas. Upon graduation and completion of her first board certification, she became board certified in Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine and is now one of 250 physicians in the U.S. with that certification. When it comes to long-term functional prognosis of a person under 21 who has suffered personal injury, there is no specialty that is more relevant than Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine.

As an attending physician at UT Southwestern Medical School/ Children's Hospital, she was responsible for staying abreast of her field and teaching resident physicians daily. She was invited by another department to be assistant fellowship director of their Neurodevelopmental Disability Fellowship.

Because of the small size of her division, she had very broad clinical responsibilities uncommon in larger programs. As the main consulting physiatrist at a Level I Trauma Center, she worked daily in the ICU interacting with the trauma, ICU and neuro-surgery teams. She cared for a full spectrum of severity of brain injury following patients in the clinic long after the other teams had signed off the case.

In the clinic, she cared for children of all ages with Cerebral Palsy. She also started her own Concussion Clinic, interacting with school nurses, teachers and coaches of each child. She was chosen to lead the first multi-disciplinary team to write a Clinical Pathway for the evaluation and treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the hospital. Her passion for this population garnered positions on state and national Traumatic Brain Injury councils and led to many invitations to lecture on the topic.

Read Why a Pediatric PM&R Subspecialist.